Dealing With The December Dilemma
MixedBlessing Holiday Greeting Cards and Understanding

 

Ah, it’s December one again and the anxiety begins to set in for families celebrating Christmas and Hanukkah. What kind of holiday cards do they send out – Christmas, Hanukkah cards, or some generic holiday greeting card? At MixedBlessing, we can answer your holiday card sending dilemma with holiday cards that incorporate the themes of both Christmas and Hanukkah. For the 2015 holiday season, we have over 50 holiday cards that reflect the meaning of respect and diversity.

If holiday cards is not the only issue you are concerned with, here are some guidelines from Interfaithfamily.com to help you through the December Dilemma.

Eight Tips for Handling the December Holidays

  1. Remember that it’s OK to participate in the holiday as a way to respect your spouse and extended family.
  2. Keep the focus on the children’s needs. What kids love most about Christmas is not the presents but the family togetherness. Help children understand they can enjoy. Christmas and Hanukkah activities without betraying either parent or their religious upbringing. Use the holidays to reinforce the children’s religious identity.
  3. If your Jewish child is uncomfortable with singing Christmas carols at school, ask the principal to broaden the holiday song repertoire to include Hanukkah songs.
  4. Rather than asking in-laws to give Christmas or Hanukkah presents, ask them to give gifts wrapped in paper that indicates the holiday the children do celebrate.
  5. If your children want a Christmas tree in your home, sit down with your partner and discuss what the holiday means to each of you. Be clear about underlying issues. Is it your own reluctance to have a tree or menorah in your home or is it a fear about how relatives might react?
  6. Giving in on a holiday becomes less significant if you remember that the main concern is to decide how your family will live religiously throughout the year, not just in December.
  7. Allow your initial decisions to change as you and your family evolve. Certain things that may have seemed important at one stage in your marriage may become less important later on. Pay attention to your own inner feelings.
  8. Develop new traditions together. Denying a need will breed resentment, but negotiating a mutually acceptable way to celebrate will strengthen the relationship and unify the family.

From www.InterfaithFamily.com